Trade Publications

Burns & McDonnell experts often write articles published in the trade publications in the many industries we work in. Here are the most recent pieces authored or co-authored by our employee-owners.

 

  • June 13, 2011

    Education, experience and examination—the traditional three E's of licensure—are the (objective) means by which an individual has demonstrated competence in a specific discipline or branch of engineering.

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  • June 1, 2011

    One question I often am asked is, "How tall should the exhaust stack be?" It's a seemingly simple question, but the only way to get an exact answer is to run an air dispersion model. That takes time, money and a qualified consultant. Not every circumstance allows, or requires, this level of effort. Here is some basic information you may use as a guide.

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  • June 1, 2011

    Burns & McDonnell is program manager for the largest construction project in Maine's history, the Maine Power Reliability Program. The $1.4 billion transmission project will employ an average of 2,100 people yearly during the five-year life of the build and is currently the largest construction project in the state.

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  • May 1, 2011

    Beginning July 1, 2011, greenhouse gases (GHGs) alone can make a source major for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) program. If your facility is classified as PSD program minor source before the Tailoring Rule you'll want to stay that way. You've probably asked yourself, "Can I stay PSD minor, and if so, how?" The short answer is yes. The long answer (you knew there was a long answer) depends on the magnitude of your actual emissions and on your potential-to-emit.

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  • April 1, 2011

    I used to believe in absolutes: on/off, legal/illegal, pregnant/not pregnant. The Environmental Protection Agency’s greenhouse gas (GHG) Tailoring rule has challenged this viewpoint. Just as the letter “y” is sometimes a vowel, greenhouse gases are sometimes a PSD pollutant.

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  • March 1, 2011

    Good news to report this month! The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revised the Paved Road predictive equations, and the change decreases the calculated amount of dust from paved road traffic. The Unpaved and Paved Road equations are critical to our industry since coal-fired power plants have huge amounts of traffic, especially if coal is delivered via truck. Although the tonnage of road dust is relatively low when compared to a combustion source, the manner in which the dust is generated creates issues in the dispersion model.

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  • March 1, 2011

    One of the basic components of virtually every engineering licensure law, standard of professional conduct and code of ethics is the principle that each of us should always and only practice in those technical areas in which we are ligitimately competent.

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  • February 1, 2011

    Food, water, air. To these basic human needs, I would add electricity. American culture and civilization depend on ever-present, affordable electricity. However, it is no secret that coal-fired generation is under attack.

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  • January 19, 2011

    A key principle of virtually every engineering licensure law, standard of professional conduct and code of ethics is that engineers should always and only practice in the technical areas in which they are competent.

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  • January 1, 2011

    When a new environmental rule comes out, the power industry is usually at its mercy with no influence on how it will apply or how the industry complies with it. One rare exception applies to the new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), specifically to how background values are set.

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  • December 1, 2010

    Burns & McDonnell has commissioned a new gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) system to expand the central utility plant for the Texas Medical Center in Houston. The new CHP plant adds significant efficiency and security advantages, too (see page 48).

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