Trade Publications

Burns & McDonnell experts often write articles published in the trade publications in the many industries we work in. Here are the most recent pieces authored or co-authored by our employee-owners.

 

  • October 22, 2012

    If you're conducting an arc flash study, you're probably using one of the many software packages that can perform the analysis for you — at the click of a button. However, as convenient as they may seem, there are several pitfalls that can cause erroneous results if you are unaware of the underlying premises behind many of the calculations. The following five considerations are important issues to keep in mind when you're doing this type of work.

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  • October 19, 2012

    In this Food Engineering magazine podcast, Burns & McDonnell Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)-certified corporate sustainability reporting (CSR) specialists discuss what is a CSR, what is the GRI and the Food Processing Sector Supplement, why are companies producing CSRs, and what are latest CSR trends.

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  • October 1, 2012

    One of EPA's six common air pollutants is particulate matter (PM); however, particular matter is actually a class of pollutants, which complicates understanding its regulation. Particulate matter is divided up by size, how it is measured and how it was formed. Particulate matter originates from not only soil and dust particles but also acids, organic chemicals and metals.

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  • October 1, 2012

    By implementing 3-D modeling, American Electric Power (AEP) experienced a 20 percent to 40 percent reduction in the time required to design a substation. Burns & McDonnell was one of the first companies AEP worked with to use 3-D for greenfield substation designs.

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  • September 1, 2012

    At first, the Sierra Club wanted to move the country "Beyond Coal" and "Beyond Oil." Today's economics support the construction of simple and combined cycle natural gas plants. Instead of endorsing this new paradigm, the Sierra Club has begun a campaign to move America "Beyond Natural Gas." We need a better breed of environmentalist.

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  • September 1, 2012

    For construction within the Angeles National Forest, the U.S. Forest Service requires minimal disturbance of the land. An unconventional design and construction solution helped Southern California Edison (SCE) gain approval from the U.S. Forest Service. Micropile foundations, a high-capacity version of foundation solutions sometimes known as pin piles or mini piles because of their small diameter, provided cost and schedule advantages over other designs due to restrictions imposed by working within the forest.

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  • August 1, 2012

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) regulation is here to stay, as indicated by a tidal wave of recent court rulings and EPA actions. Barring an act of Congress, GHG emissions will be regulated under the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD), Title V, and New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) programs.

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  • August 1, 2012

    To compete and create jobs, the U.S. must pave the way for innovative technologies. Innovation comes from engineers. For innovation to increase, the U.S. must create more engineers, and the engineers of today must improve their skill sets. What can our country do to achieve this goal? How can we as engineers stay competitive with engineers overseas?

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  • July 1, 2012

    There is a purposeful disconnect between permitting and reality. Permitted limits should be higher than actual emission rates in order to provide operating margin. Unfortunately, the secondary purpose of the new 1-hour average SO2 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) is to erode this safety factor.

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  • June 1, 2012

    For those of us down in the trenches on a daily basis, trying to implement specific regulations of the Clean Air Act (CAA), it is instructive to step back and realize that the CAA really is working. When measured objectively, the air actually is getting cleaner. And, if cleaner air is the goal of the CAA, then it is successful.

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  • May 1, 2012

    The foundation of the Clean Air Act is the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The EPA is required to review the NAAQS every five years, and it is uncommon for NAAQS to be swept up into court cases. In contrast, many recent regulations have taken a long time to come into effect or have been reversed or delayed. So, it is relatively easy for these regular NAAQS reviews to dramatically impact industry.

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