Trade Publications

Burns & McDonnell experts often write articles published in the trade publications in the many industries we work in. Here are the most recent pieces authored or co-authored by our employee-owners.

 

  • June 10, 2010

    The EPA estimates that there are more than 13,500 boilers and process heaters located at major HAP sources that will be subject to the Industrial Boiler MACT Rule. A majority — approximately 11,500 — of these boilers fire natural or refinery gas and, therefore, will be subject only to the rule's work-practice standards. However, there still are approximately 2,000 boilers that will have to comply with the rule's emissions limits.

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  • June 2, 2010

    At this year's Coal-Gen conference to be held in Pittsburgh from August 10-13, the Environmental Protection Agency's Robert Wayland, Ph.D., is scheduled to give a keynote address outlining EPA's upcoming regulatory agenda. The timing of his topic seems particularly appropriate. After all, uncertainty has been the watchword for much of the coal-fired industry ever since the Obama administration took office.

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  • June 1, 2010

    Faced with ever-more-stringent emission regulations at the state and federal levels, Minnesota Power embarked on a plan in 2006 to cut emissions from its second-largest generating unit, Boswell 3, which went online in 1973. Boswell's main fuel source is low-sulfur, low mercury coal from the Powder River Basin.

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  • May 1, 2010

    Discover the top 10 IT architecture guiding principles to determine whether new technology is the best fit for your organization.

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  • May 1, 2010

    Who isn't a little confused by the rapidly evolving issues regarding greenhouse gas regulation and their impacts on the power industry? Let's take a step back and assess the competing concerns.

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  • May 1, 2010

    Steven L. Goldman, the Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Lehigh University, argued that engineering is captive to society in two ways — intellectually, because its theory has been subordinated to science; and socially, because its practice has been limited in terms of what problems engineers are allowed to address and what solutions are considered acceptable. These two captivities are not separate, but interdependent.

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  • April 1, 2010

    We should pay attention to the EPA's reaction to the December 2008 5.4-million-cubic-yard coal ash spill resulting from a retaining wall that failed at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in Roane County, Tenn.

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  • March 1, 2010

    Despite equivocal outcomes from Copenhagen and economic challenges at home, the climate change business is still growing.

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  • March 1, 2010

    Coal-fired utilities are under attack from multiple environmental fronts: greenhouse gases, mercury and "routine" maintenance violations, to name a few. But these regulations and initiatives are too slow to sound coal's death knell. The immediate threat to coal utilities is implementation of the 1-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for NO2 and SO2.

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  • March 1, 2010

    In October, I had the privilege of speaking on the topic of "Philosophy and Structural Engineering" at the NCSEA 17th Annual Conference in Scottsdale, Ariz. While preparing that presentation, I compiled and reflected on all that I have been reading, thinking and writing over the last few years regarding the relationship between the two fields. The overall thesis that emerged was this: Science is widely perceived as an especially systematic approach to knowing; engineering could be conceived as an especially systematic approach to willing.

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  • February 22, 2010

    Our nation has not made transportation infrastructure a priority, and so we drive on highways built in the Eisenhower era. Practicing engineers must commit to mentoring the youth that will address the future of our industry.

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